Pigeons

posted by Prof. McFly on April 22, 2014

Rock Doves, also known as Pigeons, are monogamous will lay one to two eggs which hatch within eighteen days. Young are fed “pigeon milk” which is regurgitated food from both males and females. While mating occurs year round, the peak mating seasons are spring and fall.

Pigeons prefer grains for food and people will commonly feed pigeons unintentionally by spilling food or it in open trash containers. Pigeons roost in areas above ground and will readily nest in steeples, as well as voids on outside areas of buildings and other protected areas. Pigeons are dependent on humans to provide them with food, roosting and nesting sites. They are commonly found around agricultural areas as well as warehouses, feed mills, and grain elevators. They are also commonly found in cities around parks, buildings, bridges, and any other structures. Pigeons are filthy birds, causing disease and damage. Their droppings are known for triggering human slips and falls, as well as accelerating the aging of structures and statues. This makes it imperative to get rid of pigeons in highly trafficked areas. More seriously, pigeons may carry diseases such as cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, salmonella, food poisoning, and more. Also, their droppings may harbor the growth of fungus which causes histoplasmosis. Other pests may live on these birds, including fleas, lice, mites, ticks, and other pests. Pests may also infest nests such as stored product pests.

 

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Chicken Mites

posted by Prof. McFly on April 15, 2014

What is a chicken mite? Chicken mites, also known as bird mites, get their name because they live on the skin of a wide variety of birds, but especially chickens. They become structural pests when they migrate from bird nests into buildings and attack humans. They primarily feed at night, after which the mite drops off of the host. Chicken mites most often live and feed on pigeons, sparrows and chickens. They will often migrate indoors from an abandoned nest. They enter through window frames or attics. Chicken mites can also be introduced via pet birds such as canaries or on gerbils from pet stores. Chicken mites have been implicated in the transmission of St. Louis encephalitis, but their role in the transmission of the disease is not known. Chicken mites can cause painful skin irritation on humans.

Looking to get rid of bird mites or chicken mites?

  • If you own or handle birds, keep the coops and bedding clean and inspect the flock regularly for signs of an infestation.
  • Do not handle bird nests on your property, even after the birds have vacated the nest.
  • If you have pets that spend time outdoors, inspect them regularly as they can become chicken mite carriers.
  • Inspect second-hand furniture carefully before bringing indoors, as mites can be transported in bedding, furniture, and carpeting.
  • If you see signs of a chicken mite infestation in your home, contact a bird mite control professional to identify the source to treat the infestation.
  • If you have an infestation, launder bedding and clothing in hot water. Consult with a physician for proper treatment of chicken mite bites.


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Bird Diseases

posted by Prof. McFly on April 8, 2014

Disease due to bird or bird droppings affect lungs, can create respiratory issues and potentially be deadly. Below are a few diseases that birds have:

  • Ornithosis is a flu-like disease most commonly found in pigeon droppings.
  • Allergic Alveolitis, commonly known as pigeon fanciers lung a serious allergic reaction.
  • Histoplasmosis: spore of this fungus thrives in bird droppings and can affect humans.
  • Salmonella present in most pest birds-high percentage in feral pigeons and also starlings.
  • Pigeon nest bug (Cimex columbarius)
  • Cryptococcosis: Fungal disease causing severe, sometimes fatal meningitis
  • Bird Lice

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Big Brained Birds Stress Less

posted by Prof. McFly on April 1, 2014

According to research, bird species with larger than average brains have lower levels of a key stress hormone. Such birds keep their stress down by anticipating or learning to avoid problems more effectively than smaller-brained counterparts.

Birds in the wild lead a stressful life. Constantly spotting predators lurking in the trees or sensing dramatic changes in temperature is essential for survival, but can leave birds on the edge of a nervous breakdown. Reading these cues triggers changes in the birds metabolism particularly increases in the stress hormone corticosterone. A sharp release of the hormone within one to two minutes after a cue triggers an emergency response and prepares birds to react quickly to the threat. However, regular exposure to the dangers of the wild and hence to high levels of this hormone, has serious health consequences and shortens life expectancy.

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We were awarded again!

posted by Prof. McFly on March 31, 2014

Congratulations to all of our employees for doing an excellent job in 2013! You made Northwest Exterminating achieve elite status for the Super Service Award and we could not be more proud! Thanks for all that you do! Let’s make 2014 just as grand!

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